FCC v. Fox Television Stations and a Call for Protecting Emotive Speech

Wat Hopkins, Park Distinguished Visiting Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, presented his research at the Mary Junck Research Colloquium. Dr. Hopkins discussed the Supreme Court’s recent treatment of non-traditional language and the appropriate level of protection for the emotive, as well as the cognitive, element of speech. The presentation focused on the justices’ attempt in FCC v. Fox Television Stations to define the f-word and then determine whether, when used as a fleeting expletive rather than repeatedly, the word is indecent for broadcast purposes. Dr. Hopkins, a professor of communication at Virginia Tech, has published three books and a number of articles on free speech topics. The presentation was co-sponsored by the UNC Center for Media Law & Policy.

0

The Crime of the (20th) Century: How We Threw Away our Cultural Heritage for No Good Reason (and whether Google Books will bring it back)

James Boyle, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law at Duke Law School, gave a public lecture on the public domain, its erosion by copyright, and the controversial Google Books project. Boyle is the author of numerous books and articles about intellectual property and copyright law, and the way they shape our culture.

0

Sex, Libraries, and Videotapes–How Judicial Review Affects Libraries’ Practices and the First Amendment

Anne Klinefelter, Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Law Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was a featured speaker in the Mary Junck Research Colloquium series in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. She discussed how the varying levels of judicial scrutiny affect library behavior and how this behavior affects commonly attributed goals of the First Amendment.

0

Privacy and Libel on the Internet

Privacy law expert Daniel J. Solove, professor in the George Washington University School of Law, was a featured speaker in the Mary Junck Research Colloquium series in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He also spoke in professor Cathy Packer’s “Law of Cyberspace” class. He discussed his book, “The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor and Privacy on the Internet.”

View this event on iTunes U

0