Archive | Faculty

The faculty affiliates of the UNC Center for Media Law and Policy are a community of scholars interested in the interdisciplinary exploration of issues related to media law and policy. They are faculty members and staff from across the Carolina campus. Faculty affiliates are encouraged to play an active role in the life of the Center by participating in the Center’s activities and identifying opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborations.

These are the Center’s affiliated faculty:

Anne Gilliland
Dave Hansen
Anne Klinefelter
Daniel Kreiss
Christopher Lee
Gary Marchionini
Leslie Street

Anne Gilliland

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Anne Gilliland has been the scholarly communications officer for the libraries at UNC-CH since 2012. She advises the library staff on copyright and related matters; and she offers consultations, workshops, and presentations on copyright and scholarly publishing to UNC faculty, staff, and students. Previously, she was the head of the Health Sciences Copyright Management Office at the Ohio State University.

Before earning her J.D. from Capital University in 2008, Gilliland held a variety of positions in university libraries. These included 15 years as an assistant director for the Ohio Library and Information Network and nine years as the systems coordinator at the University of the South. She also holds a bachelor’s degree from Maryville College and a master’s degree in library and information science from the University of Tennessee. Her research interests include privacy issues in library archives and copyright information needs of the academy.

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Dave Hansen

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Dave Hansen is a clinical assistant professor and faculty research librarian at UNC School of Law, where he runs the library’s faculty research service. From 2011 to 2015, Hansen served as UC Berkeley Law’s Digital Library Fellow. His research has focused on how libraries and related information intermediaries can overcome copyright and other legal obstacles to provide better access to their collections online. He has written specifically on copyright exceptions for libraries and archives under Section 108 of the Copyright Act, orphan works, mass digitization, copyright protection of metadata, and issues related to expanding copyright protection of traditional knowledge. He is one of primary facilitators for a project that created the “Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use of Collections Containing Orphan Works for Libraries, Archives, and Other Memory Institutions,” which was released in December 2014. Hansen also has contributed to briefs filed on behalf of libraries, academic authors, and legal scholars in Authors Guild v. Google (Google Books digitization case), Authors Guild v. HathiTrust (research library digitization), and Cambridge University Press v. Becker (faculty use of e-reserves), and he has actively participated in submitting comments and speaking at roundtables hosted by federal agencies on library copyright issues. Hansen is a graduate of UNC’s School of Law (J.D., 2010) and School of Information and Library Science (M.S.L.S., 2012).

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Anne Klinefelter

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Anne Klinefelter is director of the law library and associate professor of law, positions she has held since 2007. She teaches courses on privacy law and writes and speaks on information policy and law topics including privacy and confidentiality law, particularly as those areas apply to libraries. Klinefelter also serves on the advisory board of the Future of Privacy Forum. Klinefelter has been active in library associations and library education. In 2012, she received the Distinguished Lecturer Award from the American Association of Law Libraries. She is a past chair of the American Association of Law Schools Section on Law Libraries and past president of the Southeastern Chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries. She also chaired the Copyright Committee of the American Association of Law Libraries. Klinefelter held leadership roles in two library consortia, serving as chair of the Consortium of Southeastern Academic Law Libraries and of the Triangle Research Libraries Network Council of Directors. Klinefelter has taught courses on law librarianship, legal research, and copyright law for librarians in the UNC School of Information and Library Science. Prior to coming to UNC, Klinefelter served as acting director of the law library at the University of Miami and also held positions in the law libraries at Boston University and the University of Alabama. She holds a bachelor’s degree with majors in English and Spanish, a master’s degree in library science, and a J.D. from the University of Alabama.

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Daniel Kreiss

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Daniel Kreiss is an assistant professor in the UNC School of Media and Journalism and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Kreiss’s research explores the impact of technological change on the public sphere and political practice. In Taking Our Country Back: The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama (Oxford University Press, 2012), Kreiss presented the history of new media and Democratic Party political campaigning over the last decade. Kreiss is currently working on a second book project, provisionally titled Networked Ward Politics: Parties, Databases, and Campaigning in the Information Age (under contract with Oxford University Press and due out in 2016). Analytically, the book argues that Obama’s two successful bids for the presidency were premised on a new form of “networked ward politics” – a data-driven, personalized, and socially-embedded form of campaigning that has developed in response to changes in American culture, social structure, and communication technologies. Kreiss is an affiliated fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and received a Ph.D. in communication from Stanford University. Kreiss’s work has appeared in New Media and Society; Journalism; Qualitative Sociology; Critical Studies in Media Communication; Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; The Journal of Information Technology and Politics; and The International Journal of Communication, in addition to other academic journals.

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Christopher Lee

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Christopher “Cal” Lee is an associate professor in the UNC School of Information and Library Science. He teaches archival administration, records management, digital curation, understanding information technology for managing digital collections, and digital forensics. He is a lead organizer and instructor for the DigCCurr Professional Institute, and he teaches professional workshops on the application of digital forensics methods and principles. Lee’s primary area of research is curation of digital collections. He is particularly interested in the professionalization of this work and the diffusion of existing tools and methods into professional practice. Lee developed “A Framework for Contextual Information in Digital Collections,” and edited and provided several chapters to the book I, Digital Personal Collections in the Digital Era, which was published by the Society of American Archivists. Lee also is principal investigator of BitCurator Access and was principal investigator of BitCurator; both projects have developed and disseminated open-source digital forensics tools for use by archivists and librarians. He was also principal investigator of the Digital Acquisition Learning Laboratory (DALL) project and is senior personnel on the DataNet Federation Consortium funded by the National Science Foundation. Lee has served as Co-PI on several projects focused on digital curation education: Preserving Access to Our Digital Future: Building an International Digital Curation Curriculum (DigCCurr), DigCCurr II: Extending an International Digital Curation Curriculum to Doctoral Students and Practitioners, Educating Stewards of Public Information for the 21st Century (ESOPI-21), Educating Stewards of the Public Information Infrastructure (ESOPI2), and Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG).

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