Sex, Libraries, and Videotapes–How Judicial Review Affects Libraries’ Practices and the First Amendment

Anne Klinefelter, Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Law Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was a featured speaker in the Mary Junck Research Colloquium series in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. She discussed how the varying levels of judicial scrutiny affect library behavior and how this behavior affects commonly attributed goals of the First Amendment.

0

Privacy and Libel on the Internet

Privacy law expert Daniel J. Solove, professor in the George Washington University School of Law, was a featured speaker in the Mary Junck Research Colloquium series in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He also spoke in professor Cathy Packer’s “Law of Cyberspace” class. He discussed his book, “The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor and Privacy on the Internet.”

View this event on iTunes U

0

Copyright Lecture

Anthony Falzone, executive director of the Fair Use Project at Stanford University, delivered a public lecture on copyright law and his recent representation of RDR Books in a copyright lawsuit brought against the book publisher by J.K. Rowlings and Warner Bros. This event was co-sponsored by the Center for Media Law and Policy, the University Library and the Triangle Research Network of Libraries. A dinner with the speaker followed the lecture.
View this event on iTunes U
Read news coverage of this event

0

Cyberspeech Symposium

Paul Jones, UNC clinical associate professor and director of ibiblio, was the keynote speaker for The First Amendment Law Review’s annual symposium at the School of Law. Co-sponsored by the UNC Center for Media Law and Policy, the 2009 symposium focused on Cyberspeech and featured prominent scholars and experts from around the country.

0

Committing Journalism: Contempt for Reporters in Post 9/11 America

Toni Locy, former USA Today reporter who won the 2008 National Press Club Freedom of the Press Award for protecting her confidential sources for stories written about the 2001 anthrax attacks, gave a public lecture at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication about the federal court proceedings to compel her to reveal her sources and the role of confidential sources for journalists investigating the government. Locy, who now is the Reynolds Professor of Legal Reporting at Washington & Lee University, also met with graduate students and faculty to discuss her court case. A dinner with the speaker and guests followed her speech.
View this event on iTunes U
Read news coverage of this event

0